Join the Nation Learn The Address

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, documentarian Ken Burns, along with numerous partners, has launched a national effort to encourage everyone in America to video record themselves reading or reciting the speech. The collection of recordings will continue to grow as more and more people are inspired by the power of history and take the challenge to Learn the Address.

Milwaukee Public Television is proud to be one of the many public television stations across the nation encouraging its viewers to learn the address. Many well-known Milwaukeeans have already recited the address - the mayor, the sheriff, the county executive, the police chief, MPTV’s general manager and some of its on-air personalities just to name a few.

Only 300 words, the Gettysburg Address resonates with Americans even today. Many educators use the address to teach students how the American government is supposed to work. Its powerful words not only remember the fierce Civil War battle that took place in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania in 1863, but emphasizes the importance of preserving self-government.

Join in and Recite the Address

The Gettysburg Address

November 19, 1863

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate–we cannot consecrate–we cannot hallow–this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us–that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion–that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain–that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom–and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

- Abraham Lincoln

THE ADDRESS

Coming to PBS Spring 2014

THE ADDRESS, a 90-minute feature length documentary by Ken Burns, will air on PBS in the spring of 2014. The film tells the story of a tiny school in Putney Vermont, the Greenwood School, where each year the students are encouraged to practice, memorize, and recite the Gettysburg Address. In its exploration of the Greenwood School, the film also unlocks the history, context and importance of President Lincoln-s most powerful address. Visit http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/the-address/home/ for more information.

Other Helpful Resources

More Information about the Gettysburg Address and Abraham Lincoln
http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/the-address/home/
http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/speeches/gettysburg.htm

Funding for THE ADDRESS is provided by Bank of America; the Anne Ray Charitable Trust; Public Broadcasting Service; and members of The Better Angels Society, including The Pfeil Foundation and Robert & Beverly Grappone. Funding was also provided by Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), as part of “American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen,” a public media initiative to help communities solve the national high school dropout crisis and keep more students on a successful path to college and career.